Posted by & filed under Patio Doors .

When adding doors leading from the inside of your home to your patio, the two most common styles of patio doors homeowners typically choose between are French doors and sliding doors. The type that you choose depends very much on your situation, whether its replacing an existing slider or changing to a different style. You should consider such factors as cost, safety, aesthetics and space consideration.

a comparison image of sliding patio doors vs french patio doors

 

The best way to decide which type is right for you is to do a comparison of the two to determine that best avenue for you to take. Both will create a portal to the outside, but sliding door and French doors do it in different ways. Although sliding doors create the illusion of no door, French doors do the opposite.

Space

Because gliding patio doors slide open and close horizontally along a track, they do not interfere with furniture located nearby. The opening section converges with the fixed section, requiring no outside space. They are a good choice for limited space inside or outside the room. There is also the advantage that they are much easier to adjust than French doors in a new home due to the house foundation shifting. For homes that are more modern-themed, they have a more contemporary look. Today’s sliding patio doors have a multipoint-locking mechanism and when engaged, these doors are very secure.

French doors on the other hand open inward and require the freedom to do so, meaning that furniture placement must be considered to accommodate the doors. French patio doors open and close like regular doors on hinges with one panel being the active one that’s used regularly, and the other panel locked into place as the passive side. These patio doors give a beautiful, classic look to the room and can provide an expansive opening when both panels are fully opened. Because of this wide width, they are perfect for moving large furniture or allowing heavy traffic in and out of the room. Also, with no track to slide on, their threshold sits at a much lower level, which is a bit easier to step over.

Cost

The costs for both these types of door can vary with a wide range of prices. You can find a good quality sliding door set with screen and vinyl frame that can cost around $350 while another one with a more study aluminum frame cost as much as $600. Most sliding patio doors come pre-assembled, but still require professional installation. Depending on where you purchase the door, you might find that installation is included in the price.

Typically, French doors are made of wood and available in maple, pine, oak and mahogany. In addition to the door itself, there is also the cost of the hardware that will vary in price. There are varying qualities of French doors and the higher the quality, the more expensive on your pocketbook. Depending on where you make your purchase, single slab, vintage French doors can cost $800 or higher. It is not uncommon to pay over $1000 for a well-made set of French doors.

Safety

Between the two, French doors are safer that sliding doors because they’re obviously doors with a wood frame surrounded by window panes. When a French door is closed, it cannot be mistaken for being open.

Sliding doors are often transparent and can be mistaken for being open. Even with today’s tempered glass that reduces serious injury if someone accidentally walks through the sliding glass door, people can still be seriously injured by this mishap. However, with the new safety glass that beads up, this doesn’t often happen, but people are still more prone to walking into closed doors thinking they are open.

Aesthetics

Depending on the motif of your home, one of the two types of doors will add a beautiful accent to any room.

Sliding doors are sleeker and more modern looking for homes that want a more open concept while French doors possess certain elegance.

Whichever you decide upon, these doors will add beauty and charm to your home.

 

If you’re still deciding between sliding patio doors or french patio doors Jans Awning Products would be happy to recommend/install either one into your home is in the Burlington, Oakville, Mississauga, Hamilton, or Brantford area. Check out our Full Selection of Patio Doors available.

Posted by & filed under Patio Doors, Roll Away Screens .

A screen door is usually fitted in front of a normal door to either keep out bugs and insects, or leaves, earth and plants during a storm. It means that you don’t have to have your main doors closed, so the air can circulate within the house – which is very important, especially in hot weather.

It is the meshing in the screen door which causes insects and debris to stay outside, so if the screen door develops a hole, this can be potentially disastrous – rendering the screen useless. So if you get a hole in your screen door, do you need to replace the whole door, or can it be repaired?

Woman looking out Patio Door

 

Repairing Small Holes in a Screen

For small holes, repairs can be made easily. In most cases you won’t need to replace the whole door – a small repair should do the trick. There are a number of techniques which you can use – depending on the size of the hole and the type of material that the screen in made from:

  • Buy screen repair kits from a hardware store, which will give you everything that you need to be able to repair the hole – as well as instructions.
  • A vinyl or fiberglass screen can be fixed with a small amount of clear nail varnish. Dab it on the edges of the hole to stop the tear from spreading as well as block up the hole.
  • If you have scraps of the same material as the screen, you can darn or patch together the hole. For a wire screen, unravel some of the mesh and use that as the thread.
  • Use a piece of silicon adhesive to patch up holes in metal or fiberglass screens. You can build up the layers until the hole is fully and securely blocked.

Repairing Large Holes in a Screen Door

For larger holes you will need to decide whether it is worth repairing it, or if you would be better off replacing the entire door. If the quality of the mesh is already poor, it might be worth replacing the entire door.

To fix a larger hole, you will need a square of replacement mesh which is a couple of inches bigger than the hole, all round. You might want to buy it, or use the mesh from an old screen if you have one.

  1. Start by cutting out the right sized square from your ‘new’ mesh – a couple of inches bigger than the hole on each edge.
  2. Unravel the horizontal wires around the hole so there is half an inch unraveled on each side.
  3. Bend the wires along each side so that they are perpendicular to the rest of the mesh – you can use a ruler or a counter edge to get an even, smooth line.
  4. Put the patch over the screen, so that the perpendicular wires poke through and hold it in place and it is covered entirely.
  5. Bend each wire individually to close, making sure that there are no bits sticking out which could catch people or clothes.

If you develop a hole in your screen door or window, it is important that you deal with it as soon as possible – both to save your home from unwanted bugs or debris, but also to ensure that it doesn’t spread. A smaller hole is much easier and quicker to fix, and by following these instructions you can deal with the problem straight away.

For more information about doors and windows, get in touch with Jans Awning Products today!

Posted by & filed under Patio Doors, Uncategorized, Windows .

As winter approaches, many homeowners face the problem of condensation building up on their windows and patio doors. Oddly enough, much of the problems associated with condensation stem from advancements in building technology. If you’re having trouble with window condensation, the chances are that you are living in what is called a tight house. This is a house that cannot adequately breathe and moisture is trapped inside. Although older homes may actually cost more to heat, the house is more breathable, cleaner and more comfortable.

Condensation

Harmful Moisture

A little fog on the lower corners or window portions during the winter months is of little concern, but the excessive fog that blocks whole windows is a major headache. The excess water can run down and damage woodwork, wallpaper, paint or plaster. It’s a problem you should pay attention to and take very seriously. Noticing it on your windows or patio door is enough for concern, but you should be more worried about where you can’t see the condensation buildup. This excess humidity may be affecting the insulation in your attic whereby it freezes and then melts when warm weather comes. It may even be forming blisters beneath your siding and under your exterior paint.

All forms of water such as humidity, water vapor, moisture, and steam are present in varying degrees in nearly all air. The moisture in wet air tries to flow toward drier air and mix with it, which scientists describe as vapor pressure. Vapor pressure can act independently of the flow of the air. It can force moisture easily through wood, plaster, brick and cement. Vapor pressure is precisely what happens when moisture seeks to escape from the humid air usually found inside your home to the drier winter air outside.

Glass is one of the building materials that stop water vapors and vapor-seal insulation. It is designed specifically to stop the escape of water vapor and protect the insulation and your walls from the ravages of water. However, increased use of these moisture trapping materials has created the modern “tight” home where moisture created by bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms can no longer flow easily to the outside. This trapped effect keeps cold air outside and moisture in, so it is very easy to build up excessive and even harmful moisture levels in a home.

How to Reduce Humidity

David Bareuther, Associated Press Building editor states that there are only three ways to reduce humidity:

  1. Get to the source: Venting all gas burners, clothes dryers, etc., to the outdoors, including the use of kitchen or bathroom exhaust fans.
  2. Ventilation for winter: Since outside air usually contains less water vapor, it will dilute the humidity of this inside air. This takes place automatically in older houses through constant infiltration of outside air.
  3. Heat: The process of heating your home will reduce the relative humidity, providing its dry heat. It will counter-balance most of the moisture produced by modern living.

To test the humidity in your home, be sure to use an accurate instrument like a sling psychrometer.

Outside Air Temperature Inside Relative Humidity
70 F Indoor Temperature
-20 degrees F or below not over 15 percent
-20 degrees F to -10 not over 20 percent
-10 degrees F to 0 not over 25 percent
0 degrees F to 10 not over 30 percent
10 degrees F to 20 not over 35 percent
20 degrees F to 40 not over 40 percent

 

Here are 7 practical steps to control condensation on your windows or patio door.

  • Install storm windows or replacement windows with double or triple glazing.
  • Shut off furnace humidifier and any other humidifying devices in your home.
  • Be sure that louvers in attic or basement crawl spaces are open and that they are large enough.
  • Run kitchen or other ventilating fans longer and more often than has been your custom.
  • Open fireplace damper to allow easier escape for moisture.
  • Air out your house a few minutes each day. Air out kitchen, laundry, and bathrooms during use or just the following use.
  • If troublesome condensation persists, see your heating contractor about an outside air intake for your furnace; about venting of gas-burning heaters and appliances; or about the installation of ventilating fans.

Because of so many variables, a condensation problem can sometimes be very tough to solve and that’s why you may have to call in an expert to work on your problem if the simpler steps to reduce humidity doesn’t work. If you feel that the problem might be caused by your windows or doors, contact us and our team will be ready to help.

Posted by & filed under North Star Windows, Patio Doors .

Sliding patio doors

Many new homes are often built with sliding doors, especially as alternative exits to the home or leading to the backyard. Sliding doors provide excellent sight lines to the outdoors and a source of natural light in the home. When old homes are renovated, many owners decide to change over to sliding doors for entry ways that look out to personal property. However, especially in a northern climate, are sliding doors an efficient option for your home?

If you live in an older home with original doors and windows, any new door will insulate better than older types and replacing them can be a good investment resulting in lower heating and cooling costs.

When purchasing new doors the best way to determine if they are an energy efficient option is to check their energy performance rating. This will make it easier to purchase a door most appropriate for your home’s climate and orientation. The energy performance rating will provide information about their potential for gaining and losing heat as well as transmitting sunlight into your home.

Heat Gain and Loss

Sliding doors can lose heat through direct conduction through the glass or glazing, frame or door. The radiation of heat into a house and out of a house from room-temperature objects. Although uncommon in most new doors, air leakage through and around them can cause heat loss, usually when installed incorrectly.

In comparison to most new doors, sliding doors usually lose much more heat than other doors because glass (the main component in sliding doors) is a very poor insulator. The most energy efficient glass doors will have metal frames with a thermal break which is a plastic insulator between inner and outer parts of the frame. Models with several glass layers are a good investment, especially in extreme climates. You can also use a foam caulking to help seal the new door frame as well as weatherstripping. Weatherstripping can be replaced annually to ensure the best seal possible around your doorways. Regardless of age or style, swinging doors still offer a much tighter seal than sliding doors. However, most home owners are still very drawn to sliding doors and they are often seen as a great value-add to any home because of high demand.

Posted by & filed under North Star Windows, Patio Doors .

In these tough economic times you have to be careful about where you spend your money. You also have to be conscious about where you might be losing it. For home owners, this could be in the heating and cooling of their home. Your money could be virtually flying out their windows and doors if the glass technology they are using is not up to par.

Jans Awning Products, of Burlington, offers North Star windows and patio doors. The perfect solution to your heating and cooling problems.

Jans offers the North Star product line and specializes in bay and bow windows as well as patio doors. These vinyl windows feature low- e glass and are tested to resist the extreme weather and temperature conditions that Southern Ontario has to offer. Tested by an independent test facility, North Star vinyl window and door products exceeded all industry standards in regards to insulation value and security. North Star offers standard Super Space ® Technology and as an option can provide Pilkington Activ™ self-cleaning glass.

Even with the most expensive, high tech windows though it is imperative that you have proper installation. Jans offers a lifetime warranty on the installation of your North Star windows. You can’t get more confidence than that. In fact they believe in their service so much, the warranty is transferable. North Star too offers a limited lifetime warranty on their windows and patio doors.

North Star Windows will pay for themselves in the money you save in heating and cooling for years to come. Don’t lose money senselessly. Visit Jans Awning Products; a Burlington home improvement institution since 1966, and ask about their window installation.

Your home is one of your biggest investments. Add to that investment and save money in the process. It’s possible.

To get a quote or to see the line of North Star windows go to Jans Awning Products at 4367 Harvester Road Unit 4 in Burlington.

To find out more about North Star Windows go to: www.northstarwindows.com