Every year, billions of birds smash into glass windows and kill themselves. Have you ever wondered why this happens? Is there a way to prevent this from happening?

Window Awning

Birds fly into windows because they can’t see the glass. They only see the reflections of trees and other natural elements in the glass. They assume that they can fly through the landscape reflected in the window. Unfortunately, they can’t.

One way of preventing this from happening is to make them realize that there is something there. Glass windows are one of the greatest threats that birds face today. They pose a threat to all bird species, but migratory birds are the biggest victims of these home design elements.

When birds hit windows, most of them die instantly. Others fall prey to predators like gulls and cats. Not only skyscrapers, private homes also endanger birds.

Why birds hit the windows?

Birds don’t see a glass window as a barrier. They only see the reflections of the trees or the sky. This is not surprising because sometimes people also walk into glass doors. While this is merely a matter of embarrassment for us, it is fatal for birds.

Home owners can prevent or reduce these collisions in several ways. Here are some solutions to this problem.

If you place bird feeders outside your windows, make sure that they are within 3 feet of the window. This will ensure that birds eating from the feeder will not gain enough speed to hurt themselves even if they try to fly through the window.

Another inexpensive and uncomplicated solution is to install a pattern on the window. Decals of hawks are not very helpful. The birds will probably never realize whether they are an abstract design or birds of prey.

Other seasonal fixes include the following.

• Place tape strips vertically or horizontally on the outside of the window. They are highly effective.
• Use window paints to obscure the window.
• Draw blinds. If you have indoor plants near the windows move them away. However, this will not help if there are reflections of the surroundings in the window.

Permanent fixes include the following:

• Install an opaque window film. This will reduce reflectivity and keep birds from hitting the windows. You can buy films that look opaque from the outside but allow you to view everything from inside. Films have to be placed on the outside of the windows for maximum effect. There is no guarantee that they will stay on these surfaces for a long time, but most of them do.
• Install awnings or shades in front of the windows. They are quite effective. They not only prevent birds from hitting your glass windows, but also provide protection from heat and dust.
• Install netting in front of the windows.

Glass Window Conclusions:

Glass windows are here to stay. They allow you to watch birds, plants and trees from inside your home. Though unintended, bird casualties are a consequence of modern home design. However, by applying some creativity you can make your windows safe for the birds.